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  • Improved Management Of Object Names – Part 2

    By on July 25, 2016

    In a previous blog entry, we introduced an alternative, script-based, approach to maintaining a mapping of symbolic names (variables) to the actual object names (strings). By using script variables instead of free-form strings, the mapping was no longer stored in a separate text file but instead it was brought into the domain of the programming language, thus enabling a lot of tooling support e.g. for renaming symbolic names or finding references of a symbolic name in the test code. However, there are still some annoyances related to managing object names like this, most notably caused by the fact that the actual object names are still plain strings: Object Names As Strings Cause Trouble Composing object names is awkward and error-prone. For instance, assume that there are two object names for an imaginary Add User dialog and an OK button in the objectsmap.js file we introduced in the previous blog...

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  • Improved Management Of Object Names

    By on July 19, 2016

    TL;DR: Using plain script language variables over the standard objects.map file simplifies refactoring and maintenance at the expense of losing the ability to generate (or reuse) the names when recording. NOTE: Throughout this blog article, we will use the JavaScript language for code samples. Everything shown here can be expressed in any of the programming languages shipped by Squish though, usually with only minor syntactic changes. Object Names To reference controls in a user interface, Squish uses so-called ‘multi property names’ in test scripts. Such names are basically strings using a dictionary-like notation to express a set of constraints which any matching object has to satisfy. For instance, the name matches the first found object for which the type property has the value Button and the text property has the value OK. Object names can also be nested to express relationships between objects. For instance, the name would match...

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  • Squish tip of the week: How to modify the WaitForObject timeout

    By on July 6, 2016

    Troubleshooting a script can be long and exhausting especially if there are objects which can not be found. Fortunately, we can adjust the timeout duration for waitForObject to save us some time. By default the duration of waitForObject is 20000 milliseconds (20 seconds), which looks like this: During the given time Squish will check if the object can be located, is visible and enabled. If this is the case, the script continues otherwise returns an error and stops.

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  • Squish 6.1 Beta with Visual Verification Points

    By on July 5, 2016

    About ten months after the release of Squish 6.0, we are proud and excited to make available a BETA of Squish 6.1 to you. The main new features of this release is an innovative approach to visual verifications; convenient application window and screen control as well as general improvements to Squish. You can read the full announcement at https://www.froglogic.com/news-events/index.php?id=squish-6.1-beta-released.html We are looking forward to your feedback which we happily accept at squish@froglogic.com.

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  • Squish tip of the week: How to Automate a Modern UI Windows Store App

    By on June 29, 2016

    Did you know that Squish supports automating Modern UI/Windows Store apps (also called Metro applications) when used on the Windows desktop*? If an application offers information about its GUI objects via UI Automation, it is possible to automate the application with Squish and the supported Microsoft’s UI Automation API. How to inspect an Application or GUI Control for UI Automation Support With the Microsoft Inspect tool (direct download) it is possible to check whether an application (or a particular GUI control in an application) exposes/supports UI Automation.

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  • Squish tip of the week: How to look up Windows control class names

    By on June 22, 2016

    When a window is created, an application defines a window class, which is registered with the system. This class defines various properties of the window like the window title, background color, cursor and the window class name itself. But how to get a Windows control class name? Class names of Windows controls can be looked up with tools like Spy++ or AU3_Spy.

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  • Squish tip of the week: Changing the Web Browser used for Automation

    By on June 15, 2016

    Did you know that Squish for Web supports test automation scripts that run your test suite several times, each time using a different browser? There are two ways to configure web browser in Squish: 1. Squish IDE Go to Edit > Server Settings > Manage AUTs…

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  • froglogic enters partnership with E.S.L. to expand into Israel

    By on June 14, 2016

    Hamburg, Germany (2016-06-14) E.S.L. and froglogic GmbH today announced a strategic partnership to distribute and support froglogic’s Squish GUI Tester and Squish Coco products in the market of Israel. E.S.L. will promote and resell Squish GUI Tester and Squish Coco in Israel and provide local, technical support services to their customers. Squish GUI Tester is the market leading, functional test automation tool for cross-platform and cross-device GUI testing on desktop, embedded, mobile platforms and web browsers. Squish Coco is the professional, cross-platform C, C++, C# and Tcl code coverage analysis tool. Both tools are used in more than 3,500 QA and development organizations around the world.

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  • Squish tip of the week: Show View Action

    By on June 8, 2016

    Squish provides various views which are not shown all the time to unclutter and tidy up the Squish interface. However, sometimes specific views are needed. So how do you access them? The easiest way is the so-called “Show View action” which is useful to open a view that isn’t already open. One way to open a new view is by clicking Window > Show View and to choose from the listed submenu. If the wanted view is not visible, click the “Other…” option to pop up the Show View dialog.

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  • Bug Location and Patch Analysis with Squish Coco 3.4

    By on June 7, 2016

    Hamburg, Germany June 7, 2016 froglogic is excited to announce version 3.4 of Squish Coco, its multi-platform C, C++, C# and Tcl code coverage analysis tool. Besides several smaller improvements, this new release of Squish Coco features two innovative, new features to help developers use code coverage data to analyze the impact of source code patches and find potential bug locations in the source code: Extended Patch Analysis. With this feature, a source code patch can be analyzed to find out which tests have covered the modified code. The analysis identifies the impact areas of the changes and the associated vulnerabilities. This extends the Squish Coco 3.3 pre-commit patch analysis feature, which analyzed the impact of a patch only before it was committed. Bug Location. This feature allows computing, based on coverage data, a list of source code lines which are most likely responsible for a failure in the...

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  • Review of Squish Day Munich

    By on June 6, 2016

    The first froglogic “Squish Day” is over with more than twenty people joining us in Munich, Germany.

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  • Squish tip of the week: Breakpoints View

    By on June 1, 2016

    Usually, breakpoints are good for debugging or extending an existing test case with further actions. However, what if you want to run several test cases or a test suite with breakpoints or want to disable certain breakpoints in specific test cases? Sure, you could do this by opening every single test case and selecting or deselecting breakpoints. But wait, there is a more convenient way of doing this and to see, skip or remove breakpoints in bulk.

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  • froglogic expands into the Chinese market

    By on June 1, 2016

    After a great start into 2016, froglogic today announced that it will form a strategic partnership with Apera to build a localized offering of the Squish GUI Tester and Squish Coco Code Coverage tools in the markets of China, Macao, Hongkong and Taiwan.

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  • Squish tip of the week: How to Record after a Breakpoint

    By on May 25, 2016

    In some cases it is necessary to extend an existing test case with further actions. However, it would be tedious to have to re-record the entire test from scratch. For example just to click an additional icon or button in the test. One solution it to edit the test script and add a few lines with the additional actions that are required. However, sometimes it is more convenient to simply record the extra actions at the point in the script where they are required. Recording within an existing test is possible by placing a breakpoint in an existing test script at the point where the newly recorded actions should be inserted. Once the breakpoint is in place, execute the test which will then stop running as soon as the breakpoint is reached.

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  • Locating Bugs by Comparing Coverage of Two Tests

    By on May 23, 2016

    The typical answer to the question: Which source code line is responsible for a bug? is Use a debugger! However, it’s not always that simple. Here’s why: Without good working knowledge of the code, it can be difficult to set a breakpoint at a pertinent location, enabling you to even start the investigation. Many problems are difficult to reproduce because the environment is unavailable or the issue doesn’t occur systematically. Issues are not always discovered by developers themselves, but instead reported by an integration team using a detail-lacking report – often requiring further interpretation. The number of source code lines containing error candidates can be reduced using Squish Coco’s coverage information: simply compare the execution of two similar tests and analyze the difference between the passed and the failed test.

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  • Squish tip of the week: How to add a Breakpoint in a Test Case

    By on May 18, 2016

    Adding a breakpoint in a test script is easy and can be very useful when inserting a verification point or adding missing and additional steps. Furthermore, the breakpoint functionality can be used to see the call stack and to use the Spy to examine application object property values.

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  • Squish Day Munich: Learn from froglogic's experts about Squish!

    By on May 12, 2016

    Do you want to learn from froglogic engineers everything about automated GUI Testing with  Squish GUI Tester and Code Coverage Analysis with Squish Coco? Join us for a day at the Squish Day in Munich

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  • Squish tip of the week: How to automatically update screenshot verification points

    By on May 11, 2016

    Did you know that Squish supports an easy way to deal with screenshot verification points when there are significant changes in the appearance of applications? As it is quite common that GUI’s of applications change with new releases, features and enhancements, it would be a real pain to retake all screenshots manually. The solution to this problem is to automatically update all screenshot verification points with one single command:

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  • Squish tip of the week: 32-bit or 64-bit: Picking the Right Squish Binary Package

    By on May 4, 2016

    Sometimes we get asked what is the right Squish binary package to download? To answer this question, we first need to find out what 32-bit and 64-bit is. The terms 32-bit and 64-bit (the number of bits is called the word size*) refers to the information processing of the processor of a computer processor, also known as Central Processing Unit or CPU. The type of processor a computer has affects not only its overall performance but can also dictate what kind of software it uses. 32-bit versus 64-bit As the number of bits increases, there are significant benefits. More bits means that data will be processed in larger chunks which also means more accurately as the system can point to or address a greater number of locations in physical memory. Software programs that require many calculations to function smoothly can operate faster and more efficiently. Squish binary packages can...

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  • Squish tip of the week: How to describe your automated tests

    By on April 27, 2016

    While working on automating test cases, it is important to describe them well. After some time, the number of automated test cases can be enormous. Giving your test suites and test cases self-explaining and meaningful names can help in the future when you try to find a particular test case among hundreds you already automated. How to provide an additional description of a test case? Your test cases are scripted programs written in one of scripting languages supported by Squish (Python, JavaScript, Perl, Ruby, Tcl). Therefore, at the beginning of each test case you can always have a comment section with a description. Unfortunately, this description will not be included in test case execution results.

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